My Season 1.1 review (or, see Jenny talk about DSC for 5 minutes and let her tell you why Lethe is so great for Sarek)

Ten years before Kirk, Spock and the Enterprise, the USS Discovery discovers new worlds and lifeforms as one Starfleet officer learns to understand all things alien.
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Jenny
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My Season 1.1 review (or, see Jenny talk about DSC for 5 minutes and let her tell you why Lethe is so great for Sarek)

Post by Jenny » Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:28 am

Now that the first eight episodes have aired I wanted to post my opinion/an incoherent mess on it:

To get one thing out of the way: I live in Germany, therefore I was able to watch the show on Netflix and not on CBS All-Access, I have never experienced any Discovery-related loading problems and I didn't have to pay extra for it.

Discovery's first two episdoes are a sort of prologue to the rest of the show and I am uncertain if this did the show any good. Of course the two episodes had some important set up for later episodes like (btw spoilers ahead) the Klingons eating the corpse of Captain Georgiou. I'm sorry but that was just disgusting. That was probably one of my least favorite moments of the episode it appeared in (fourth, if I am not mistaken) but I digress. I think these two episodes had some good stuff in them like Saru and Georgiou and some less good stuff in the general writing. I was okay with the Klingons. Personally I'd have liked a generally continuity-low show that doesn't need to rely on what we've previously seen and just deals with something new, but hey, the producers said the war won't extend into the second season and from the looks of the final episode in the half season we might have some more exploring (or at least Voyaging ;) ) coming. But I digress. The first two episodes were a mixed bag with maybe a bit more positives than negatives. And I have to say one thing: the show looks stunning.

Next is "Context is for Kings". So, my favorite things out of this episode were certainly Tilly and Stamets. Tilly because she is a delight in this otherwise mostly dark show and Stamets because I like his anti-war and pro-science attitude. Lorca is certainly as fucked up a captain as Jason Isaacs told us he'd be and I'm honestly intrigued. I was hoping (and to some degree expecting) the Saru-Burnham dynamic in this episode to become much like that of Quark and Odo in the later DS9 seasons, but nope, that didn't happen at all. Not sure if I dislike that or not but I hope that by the end of the show they won't hate each-other :D

Episode four is *takes breath* "The Butcher's Knife Cares Not for the Lamb's Cry". This title (along with other Discovery titles) is pretentious as fuck and I love it. The title reminds me of "The Devil in the Dark" where we as the audience are to assume that the Devil is the horta killing the humans but it's actually the humans stealing the horta's children. Similarly we are to assume that the tardigrade does not care for its human victims while it is actually Landry and the likes of her who want to win the war at all costs, no matter who gets hurt in the process. So far I think this shows lacks an explicit anti-war message but it's doing alright on the implicit anti-war front. Also, ( and I think this was in this episode) the Stamets and Culber tooth brushing scene was probably one of my favorite Star Trek horror moments. I'm not exactly an expert on horror but I love how they used really easy means to a distressing effect. Plus, I get scared easily. So it may just be that. I don't have to tell you I liked this one, right?

"Choose Your Pain": Interesting episode, I'm neutral on Tyler, nice seeing Saru in command but also seeing that not every officer has to be instantly a perfect Co. See, I can do this without getting overly off-topic.

"Lethe" will probably forever be remembered for its unpronounceable name, but for me the Vulcan surroundings in Sarek's and Burnham's mindscape stand out. Again, I loved those visuals. One thing I really appreciate about this episode is the backstory between Burnham and Sarek (and to some extension Spock). I always found Sarek to be highly unlikable due to his behavior towards Spock but this episode adds a whole new element of tragedy to his character. He purposefully denies Burnham her rightful place at the Vulcan expedition group in order for Spock getting in, but by the time Spock would be allowed to enter he chooses Starfleet, thus all the wrongs Sarek committed towards Burnham become pointless and he sees that all of his plans and schemes ultimately lead to loosing both of his children to Starfleet. Another interesting thing (although not really redeeming Sarek): Why did he choose Spock over Burnham. Essentially I can think of three possible reasons: Burnham is a woman, Burnham is a human, Burnham is not his biological descendant. I find the first to be highly unlikely. Vulcan's are dicks but not sexist dicks. If Sarek's reason for adopting Burnham is to show that Humans raised like Vulcans can show the same logic traits (which btw is an aspect I absolutely love and I fully agree with) I doubt that he would choose Spock over her for that reason. That leaves us with the classic "blood is thicker than adoption" showing Sarek acting out of emotion and not reason (as it would be a stronger example of Humans being able to act like Vulcans) and ultimately paying the price for it in form of neither of his kids fulfilling his dream. Spock eventually reconnects with his human half and who knows what will happen to Burnham. Okay, can you tell that I have a lot to say about this episode? Anyway, I liked it.

"Magic to make the Sanest Man Go Mad": The one episode that is allowed to be fun and romance and not depressing war and family drama. Huzzah! Harry Mudd is absolutely awesome. The TOS version of him was a lot more silly or at least less cruel to his fellow lifeforms but I can see that being due to the prolonged exposure to Stella. And I like how this episode (and the previous Mudd episode) add a sense of seriousness and threat to his character in TOS as we now know that he truly is capable of pulling some seriously immoral and murderous shit.

"The one that was written in Latin": I thought it was alright. I certainly loved that the aliens on the planet (which looked great) weren't actually evil or something, that it was just Saru who lost control. Also, all the previous episodes seemed to imply that Saru is physically rather weak. I loved how his full (physical) potential was shown here and how much that makes me want to see the predators on his planet.

Rejoice fellow poster, thou hast finally reached the end of mine post. "Into the Forest I Go" is easily the best Discovery episode (Yet, I hope :D ) It's just one of these "everything fits" cases. The mission to the Klingon ship worked (although the prop designers really should have made the beacons or whatever they were smaller and less noisy, but that's a really minor nitpick) , for the first time I was intrigued by Tyler, nice to see the admiral be a psychiatrist pay off, Burnham had her revenge moment and took her former CO's badge, Stamets and Culbert's kiss, Lorca doing that thing to his eyes right before the explosion and of course the cliffhanger.

I don't want to give the half-season a numbered rating, so I'll just say that it was probably the strongest first half-season of the spin-offs (certainly better than that of TNG, Enterprise and Voyager, haven't seen DS9 in a while), it got better as the season went on and I liked it and look forward to January.

:arrow: Jenny :!:
Hi :3

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Re: My Season 1.1 review (or, see Jenny talk about DSC for 5 minutes and let her tell you why Lethe is so great for Sare

Post by marsh8472 » Tue Dec 26, 2017 8:56 pm

Jenny wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:28 am
Now that the first eight episodes have aired I wanted to post my opinion/an incoherent mess on it:

To get one thing out of the way: I live in Germany, therefore I was able to watch the show on Netflix and not on CBS All-Access, I have never experienced any Discovery-related loading problems and I didn't have to pay extra for it.
I don't have CBS :) That's lame they don't put it on netflix in the United States as well
Jenny wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:28 am
Discovery's first two episdoes are a sort of prologue to the rest of the show and I am uncertain if this did the show any good. Of course the two episodes had some important set up for later episodes like (btw spoilers ahead) the Klingons eating the corpse of Captain Georgiou. I'm sorry but that was just disgusting. That was probably one of my least favorite moments of the episode it appeared in (fourth, if I am not mistaken) but I digress. I think these two episodes had some good stuff in them like Saru and Georgiou and some less good stuff in the general writing. I was okay with the Klingons. Personally I'd have liked a generally continuity-low show that doesn't need to rely on what we've previously seen and just deals with something new, but hey, the producers said the war won't extend into the second season and from the looks of the final episode in the half season we might have some more exploring (or at least Voyaging ;) ) coming. But I digress. The first two episodes were a mixed bag with maybe a bit more positives than negatives. And I have to say one thing: the show looks stunning.
Yeah there's things they didn't need to put in there like the Klingon eating human thing. The prisoner point of view intrigued me a bit. Overall the visuals were better than I was expecting. The decision to make the series a dark series is alittle too played out now these days. I've seen this dark writing approach with walking dead, continuum, game of thrones, the batman trilogy. Not following continuity of TOS was disappointing. Not sure why the writers have been so drawn to the original series era lately.
Jenny wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:28 am
Next is "Context is for Kings". So, my favorite things out of this episode were certainly Tilly and Stamets. Tilly because she is a delight in this otherwise mostly dark show and Stamets because I like his anti-war and pro-science attitude. Lorca is certainly as fucked up a captain as Jason Isaacs told us he'd be and I'm honestly intrigued. I was hoping (and to some degree expecting) the Saru-Burnham dynamic in this episode to become much like that of Quark and Odo in the later DS9 seasons, but nope, that didn't happen at all. Not sure if I dislike that or not but I hope that by the end of the show they won't hate each-other :D
This episode was alright. Seeing Discovery for the first time was neat.
Jenny wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:28 am
Episode four is *takes breath* "The Butcher's Knife Cares Not for the Lamb's Cry". This title (along with other Discovery titles) is pretentious as fuck and I love it. The title reminds me of "The Devil in the Dark" where we as the audience are to assume that the Devil is the horta killing the humans but it's actually the humans stealing the horta's children. Similarly we are to assume that the tardigrade does not care for its human victims while it is actually Landry and the likes of her who want to win the war at all costs, no matter who gets hurt in the process. So far I think this shows lacks an explicit anti-war message but it's doing alright on the implicit anti-war front. Also, ( and I think this was in this episode) the Stamets and Culber tooth brushing scene was probably one of my favorite Star Trek horror moments. I'm not exactly an expert on horror but I love how they used really easy means to a distressing effect. Plus, I get scared easily. So it may just be that. I don't have to tell you I liked this one, right?
The titles are a bit too long. That's a common complaint I've seen. The mirror thing was interesting but they didn't go anywhere with it in the next episodes. :Andorian ReallyShocked:
Jenny wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:28 am
"Choose Your Pain": Interesting episode, I'm neutral on Tyler, nice seeing Saru in command but also seeing that not every officer has to be instantly a perfect Co. See, I can do this without getting overly off-topic.
Seeing Robert April mentioned was neat. That's been a loose end.
Jenny wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:28 am
"Lethe" will probably forever be remembered for its unpronounceable name, but for me the Vulcan surroundings in Sarek's and Burnham's mindscape stand out. Again, I loved those visuals. One thing I really appreciate about this episode is the backstory between Burnham and Sarek (and to some extension Spock). I always found Sarek to be highly unlikable due to his behavior towards Spock but this episode adds a whole new element of tragedy to his character. He purposefully denies Burnham her rightful place at the Vulcan expedition group in order for Spock getting in, but by the time Spock would be allowed to enter he chooses Starfleet, thus all the wrongs Sarek committed towards Burnham become pointless and he sees that all of his plans and schemes ultimately lead to loosing both of his children to Starfleet. Another interesting thing (although not really redeeming Sarek): Why did he choose Spock over Burnham. Essentially I can think of three possible reasons: Burnham is a woman, Burnham is a human, Burnham is not his biological descendant. I find the first to be highly unlikely. Vulcan's are dicks but not sexist dicks. If Sarek's reason for adopting Burnham is to show that Humans raised like Vulcans can show the same logic traits (which btw is an aspect I absolutely love and I fully agree with) I doubt that he would choose Spock over her for that reason. That leaves us with the classic "blood is thicker than adoption" showing Sarek acting out of emotion and not reason (as it would be a stronger example of Humans being able to act like Vulcans) and ultimately paying the price for it in form of neither of his kids fulfilling his dream. Spock eventually reconnects with his human half and who knows what will happen to Burnham. Okay, can you tell that I have a lot to say about this episode? Anyway, I liked it.
This was a good episode to the Sarek, vulcan, and TOS fans in general.
Jenny wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:28 am
"Magic to make the Sanest Man Go Mad": The one episode that is allowed to be fun and romance and not depressing war and family drama. Huzzah! Harry Mudd is absolutely awesome. The TOS version of him was a lot more silly or at least less cruel to his fellow lifeforms but I can see that being due to the prolonged exposure to Stella. And I like how this episode (and the previous Mudd episode) add a sense of seriousness and threat to his character in TOS as we now know that he truly is capable of pulling some seriously immoral and murderous shit.
It reminds of TNG "Cause and Effect". Harry Mudd's casual killing of people seemed out of character for him.

Jenny wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:28 am
"The one that was written in Latin": I thought it was alright. I certainly loved that the aliens on the planet (which looked great) weren't actually evil or something, that it was just Saru who lost control. Also, all the previous episodes seemed to imply that Saru is physically rather weak. I loved how his full (physical) potential was shown here and how much that makes me want to see the predators on his planet.
It was nice having an episode that takes place on a planet for a change.
Jenny wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:28 am
Rejoice fellow poster, thou hast finally reached the end of mine post. "Into the Forest I Go" is easily the best Discovery episode (Yet, I hope :D ) It's just one of these "everything fits" cases. The mission to the Klingon ship worked (although the prop designers really should have made the beacons or whatever they were smaller and less noisy, but that's a really minor nitpick) , for the first time I was intrigued by Tyler, nice to see the admiral be a psychiatrist pay off, Burnham had her revenge moment and took her former CO's badge, Stamets and Culbert's kiss, Lorca doing that thing to his eyes right before the explosion and of course the cliffhanger.
This was my favorite episode of the season. Though I enjoyed the other series more. This series takes the star wars approach by attempting to blow away the audience with a lot of stunning visuals and action. I prefer the a more thought provoking episode. I heard CBS was going to make another twilight zone series, maybe that'll be more my taste.
Jenny wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 9:28 am
I don't want to give the half-season a numbered rating, so I'll just say that it was probably the strongest first half-season of the spin-offs (certainly better than that of TNG, Enterprise and Voyager, haven't seen DS9 in a while), it got better as the season went on and I liked it and look forward to January.

:arrow: Jenny :!:
Their different writing approach makes it difficult for me to compare with the other series. But I probably prefer the other series to this one. Less than 2 weeks away from the next set of episodes :AndorianCool:

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Jenny
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Re: My Season 1.1 review (or, see Jenny talk about DSC for 5 minutes and let her tell you why Lethe is so great for Sare

Post by Jenny » Thu Jan 18, 2018 8:42 am

marsh8472 wrote:
Tue Dec 26, 2017 8:56 pm
The mirror thing was interesting but they didn't go anywhere with it in the next episodes. :Andorian ReallyShocked:
Weeeeell, I guess the mirror thing makes a bit more sense now :D
Hi :3

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